Leer más

Leer más

Ya con Daniel en nuestro poder, el momento de buscar Padrinos para su próximo bautizo llego, y como tiene una mamá diseñadora que mejor forma que hacer unas pequeñas tarjetas de petición de padrinos? En este caso le hemos pedido a dos grandes amigos que fuesen los padrinos de BabyMazinger, y posiblemente hay alguien en la web que necesite algo similar. En fin, les dejo los png’s y los svg’s y si los usan, no olviden comentar su experiencia!

Modelo de tarjeta para Petición de Padrinos (Link)

 

Petición de Madrina: “Las mejores amigas son promovidas a Madrinas”

Petición de Padrino: “Los mejores amigos son promovidos a Padrinos”


This post has a nicer formatting that can be seen at it's original source at tatica.org , so feel free to hit the link and read better version!

Leer más

Leer más

A couple years ago Sara was leading a project to figure out a way to convey the spirit of an open cloud to our internal audiences. A recurrent element in our journey has been the need to communicate visually not only the growing portfolio but also the multi-faceted open source strategy in the cloud, recognizing the many nuances and complexities of it.

Over the years we’ve crafted many vehicles to do so, from the simple ones like this spheniscidae, the hexagon, or the many logo slides to the complex like the portfolio, choice or approach ones. But we were missing simpler elements, particularly ones with a story that you can tell at a bus stop. I kept telling Sara to think as an open cloud enthusiast picking which temporary tattoo to apply. So working with the internal community the team came up with the open cloud ninja sloth:

As you can notice, the sloth came with the addition of an icon highlighting the “open” nature of the cloud, and our designer was quick to notice the hidden heart as well. Since then, the sloth and the open cloud icon have been spotted from stickers to challenge coins, but I was never expecting to find an Aussie wearing an open cloud ninja sloth t-shirt in Las Vegas (arguably, Vegas would be the one place where you could expect that)

Funnily enough, I didn’t know where he got his t-shirt from (Ignite Australia), and he didn’t know where the sloth came from. So I shared with him the story of the open cloud ninja sloth. The cloud with a heart that is literally open and the ninja sloth committed to that open cloud which might surprise you… even if slooooow.

I learned a ton from the journey of the open cloud ninja sloth and can’t stop encouraging teams to work on their icon and spirit animals even if they don’t have a product or a brand to push and even if they excel at any other type of visual expression.

At the very least it invites a question at a bus stop, or an impromptu storytelling session in Vegas.

With a hat tip to Ken, Ale and David, thanking Caroline for always reminding me when someone asks for the story and wishing Sara all the best in her new role!

Leer más

This post is inspired in equal parts by Ashley’s fantastic post on why she joined Microsoft and Keith’s one on why he left Microsoft. Both tell great stories about open source at Microsoft. Here’s my take on them.

There’s no shortage of stories when it comes to open source in this place. Later this summer, it’ll be 7 years since I joined Microsoft, every single day of which I’ve spent working passionately in the open source space.

I joined Microsoft as an expat living in Ecuador when the local GM asked me to lead open source strategy for a handful of emerging markets in the region. At that time, I had spent 8 years of my career focusing on open source, from community to product. Canaima had been in market for a year and I was actively applying the learnings from years involved in policymaking efforts in Venezuela where I had the opportunity to join congressional workshops and debate with Microsoft reps that would then become my colleagues.

Suffice to say that what was front and center in every conversation I had wasn’t associated with Microsoft back then, and that my decision to join Microsoft didn’t come without repercussions.

I was immediately dismissed from the board of a local free software group and countless networks and contacts closed, a few still to date. My dad gifted me a copy of this book shortly after a local newspaper ran an interview with me about open source which he disagreed with (he insists I’m reading too much into the gift) And like many others, I was also thrown into the world of Office and Windows, products I hadn’t used since I was a teenager.

There are increasingly more posts (like Ashley’s) that brilliantly explain why would someone come in those conditions, and I won’t bother you with mine because hindsight is 20/20, but let me say that as terrible as all of that might sound, it was also a true calling – a calling for transformation. And after all this time responding to that call, I realize how thankful I am for being able to say my entire career at Microsoft has been focused on open source.

On one of my first trips to Redmond, I got to meet a handful of others in my role around the globe, and we were starting to cross-pollinate that community with the high-profile hires Microsoft had then. Just a few years later I had an opportunity to come to Redmond and help lead that community – a community that is still heavily influenced by Ramji’s and Hilf’s contributions to the space.

While in LATAM I had an opportunity to drive impact in disruptive ways: from supporting a Postgres conference (5 years before we had this) to coaching Microsoft Student Partners in rolling out a Linux distro. In my first few years in Redmond, I worked on projects from deprecating taxonomy and helping write priority memos so it was unequivocally clear how we wanted to work with open source, to curating and sharing global best practices and defining field strategy, all things I did with Mark Hill while I was his CTO.

Of course, those were testing years. I would equate some of my experiences to trying to change a belt in a running engine. It didn’t take long to realize we needed a new engine, and I had the opportunity to write a spec for it in an internal forum called ThinkWeek. When the paper got a Certificate of Excellence (long story short, way too many Skypers voted for it) I realized that the pieces had arrived and we were being offered a chance to build it. John said it best in his ChefConf keynote: it was a mix of opportunity, changing demographics and strategy shifts.

And although open source is visible across the company, it’s much harder to hide it in Azure, a product that I had first interacted with in 2008 (when Miguel de Icaza ran an open source panel at PDC08) and that I had mostly ignored in my first years at Microsoft (arguably because it was called Windows Azure then) but that in my eyes provided a clear vehicle for that open source transformation I joined for.

And so that’s how I ended up in the cloud whirlwind a few years ago, focusing on the open source portfolio across Linux, Java, Node.js, DevOps and containers, helping define and land our approach to open source and supporting our work with the ecosystem at large, lurking behind papers and decks in partnership with amazing people like John, Julia, Joseph, Gebi, Mark or folks around the globe like Caroline, Frederic, Alex, Rafael, Olga or Tito.

The first time I traveled to Redmond I met a dozen of open source enthusiasts from around the world (it might have been Gianugo’s first day, too) and fast forward to today where I get to share with 700 of my colleagues in a Yammer group dedicated to open source in the cloud. My colleague Stuart volunteers to help employees that want to take the LFCS certification: that’s another 700. Our team lives and breathes open source in a way that lets us share market intelligence with customers, partners and the community at large.

Later this month at our yearly readiness conference we will have a dedicated open source track. At the Inspire conference, we’ll award the Open Source Partner of the Year award for the third year in a row. And there’s no shortage of industry chatter on this transformation – for which we’re thankful and we learn every day.

But it’d be very easy to get lost in what’s new and what’s different and not realize why it’s meaningful. Stories like Ashley’s give us not only a fresh perspective but the energy to run the engines. And stories like Keith’s and others who have pursued a different career at Microsoft or elsewhere after being part of this open source journey (like Alessandro, Sara, Ahmet or Nik) motivate us to do it right.

When college interns and high schoolers alike reach out to shadow and spend time learning about open source in a place like this, that’s meaningful. When a customer in France interrupt your presentation to ask for your take on a particular corner of the open source world so they can make investment decisions, well, that’s simply awesome.

And that’s why stories like these inspire all of us doing open source at Microsoft. Welcome, good luck, keep being awesome, stay in touch, whatever that is: here’s to more open source stories!

Leer más

Registro WordPress

La solución es de forma inmediata, dentro del Escritorio (al que accedas administración del WordPress), le vas hacer click en  a Ajustes, Generales y activas o desactiva el checkbox de: Cualquiera puede registrarse. depende para lo que requieras.

Si lo que tienes  problema con usuarios que se registran y en realidad son robots o personas spammers, usa el plugin que mencione anteriormente  http://blog.julioh.com.ve/?p=476 en el cual se hace ocultar la url de wp-admin  otra forma es usando .httpass dentro de los directorios y bloqueando su acceso, o en su momentos podrías saber cual es tu ip para indicarle desde donde te conectas por ejemplo algo así.


order allow,deny
deny from 8.8.8.8
deny from 8.8.8.9
allow from all

Leer más

WordPress por ser un CMS mas usado pues tienes vulnerabilidades y necesitamos blindarlo en seguridad y que mejor usando plugins para que no tengas una mala experiencia.

Esta es una de esas en la cual la ruta  ../wp-admin/ la remplazas para evitar acceso a ella.

En el caso el plugin WPS Hide Login no vas a eliminar /wp-login.php o /wp-admin , pero si lo va remplazar para no sea visible y colocaremos una url que solo sabremos nosotros.

Lo buscamos  WPS Hide Login en plugins  haz clic en Instalar y posteriormente en Activar.

En el plugin accede a Ajustes, Generales y establece la palabra de paso que sustituirá al clásico:

wp-admin por no-vasaentrar guardas los cambios y pruebas.

Configuración del plugin

Cuando intentas acceder a  http://tu-dominio.com/wp-admin
Te dará un 404 not found

De igual forma  también para  /wp-login.php no existen.

 

Prueba de acceso incorrecta

Si por el contrario pones la url de tu dominio con la palabra de paso establecida:

http://tu-dominio.com/?no-vasaentrar

Te va a salir tu panel para acceder, que se busca con esto, evitar ataques de diccionario, evitar suscripciones y proteger tu CMS de la mejor manera.

si por casualidad no te acuerdas de la url, puedes borrar el plugin en la carpeta wp-content y vuelve a la ruta original

 

Leer más

Leer más

La idea es saber que tienes todo lo necesario para levantar una instancia en django

Tenemos que instalar pyhton para eso, depende de tu Sistema Operativo en mi caso uso Elementary

aptitude install python

Luego entramos en la carpeta y creamos con el nombre de nuestro proyecto

mkdir entorno

Al siguiente paso accedemos dentro de la carpeta entorno
Ya dentro de la carpeta ejecutamos el siguiente comando para crear el entorno
virtualenv .
Installing distribute.............................................................................................................................................................................................done.
Installing pip...............done

Luego para entrar a nuestro entorno ejecutamos lo siguiente
source bin/activate

Ya dentro de nuestro entorno nos damos cuenta por lo siguiente la terminal se coloca de la siguiente manera
(entorno)julioh@mordor:~/githubJulioh/entorno$
Ahora procedemos a instalar
pip install django
Luego de instalar, creamos los archivos base
django-admin startproject entorno

Cuando realizamos este comando nos crea una carpeta llamada entorno y adentro los siguientes archivos.

??? db.sqlite3
??? entorno
?   ??? __init__.py
?   ??? __init__.pyc
?   ??? settings.py
?   ??? settings.pyc
?   ??? urls.py
?   ??? urls.pyc
?   ??? wsgi.py
?   ??? wsgi.pyc
??? manage.py

Luego por ultimo nos falta es levantar el servicio y verlo desde nuestro navegador

python manage.py runserver
Nos sale lo siguiente
Performing system checks...

System check identified no issues (0 silenced).

You have 13 unapplied migration(s). Your project may not work properly until you apply the migrations for app(s): admin, auth, contenttypes, sessions.
Run ‘python manage.py migrate’ to apply them.

June 17, 2017 – 11:45:47
Django version 1.11.2, using settings ‘entorno.settings’
Starting development server at http://127.0.0.1:8000/
Quit the server with CONTROL-C.

Nos sale la siguiente imagen  It worked!
Congratulations on your first Django-powered page

Leer más